Categories
Uncategorized

September 2020

 

A REFORM CONGREGATION  

5150 Peridia Blvd E. BRADENTON, FL 34203

www.TempleBethElBradenton.org
TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com     941-755-4900

Due to the COViD-19 Viral pandemic, live Shabbat Services are are cancelled until further notice.

Shabbat Services can be seen on youtube at Temple_Beth_El_Bradenton

 

 

NEWS AND VIEWS

BY RABBI MICHAEL STERNFIELD

Dear friends,

In a few weeks, we will be turning the calendar on yet another year, according to the Jewish counting. With what sentiments will be saying goodbye to 5780? For fully half of this year, soon past, we have been mostly in isolation. Not only have we been unable to join together for Shabbat services and other activities; our entire lives have been put on hold. Speaking personally, I will be looking back on 5780 with considerable regret. It has been mostly a lost year, with no way to make up for that loss, all the more so because 5781 offers no promise that the pandemic will end soon. That we could spend the coming year in similar isolation, that the death rate will continue as it is now, is a prospect we don’t want even to think about.

 

In normal years, we look forward with anticipation for the year ahead, and recite sh’hechiyanu that we have reached this day. We will recite that prayer multiple times at our High Holy Days services but I sense that the mood will be less joyous. Of course, we are thankful that we have made it this far. Still, my mind and I would surmise yours as well, is preoccupied with would’ves, could’ves and should’ves. Should we be so fortunate to return to a more normal existence, my hope for all of us is that we will enter upon from 5781 with the determination to delay less and do more. To borrow a well-known phrase spoken by Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr., there is “a fierce urgency of now.”

 

To use a simple metaphor, I would say that looking through the rear-view mirror best describes the spirit of the High Holy Days. We all have our hopes and dreams. we cannot see what lies on the road ahead. But we can look back, from where we have come, and as we do, perhaps we will have gained an added appreciation that there is not a single day to waste. There really never was, although we often acted that way. If 5780 will have taught us this lesson, this alone is reason enough to recite sh’hechiyanu. I have long felt and personally have come to accept that the good times in our lives teach us nothing. It is only through adversity that we may grow in wisdom.

 

So, should we be so fortunate to come through to the other side of this pandemic sooner rather than later, my hope for all of us is that we will emerge with a much great awareness of how precious each day is; the determination to make fuller use of whatever time there will be in our Book of Life.

 

I read recently that there is a reason why, in our cars, the rear-view mirror is so small and the front windshield is so large. Looking back with a sense of regret is of limited value. But to face forward with a greater appreciation for the gift of life—that is something worth celebrating! So, as we observe the beginning of a New Year, let’s do our best to do so with a great sense of urgency.

 

Deborah and I wish you and your dear ones L’shana tova tikateivu.

Shalom,

Rabbi Michael P. Sternfield


Music

Cantor Bard

“Looking  to the new year ahead when, God, and the Art of Science, -willing we can altogether rise and shine in song, sweet harmony ..For real!”

"Those who sing, pray twice." (Talmud)

Notes from the Cantor

L’SHANAH    TOVAH !! 

A New Year !!

 

The wheel turns …Renewal!

 

We look ahead with optimism and hope 

We count our blessings 

We do our T’shuvah and resolve to walk the talk,

and  become our better selves .

 

T’KI-Aaaahhh!

 

Our hearts are full .

 

Wishing each of you and every one a

Good new year of life.

 

Zei Gezunt !

 

Fondly, 

 

Cantor DB , Rabbi MPS 

and Family 

Please visit https://www.templebethelbradenton.org/ and listen to recordings of holiday songs by our own Cantor Bard, Cantor Joseph Portnoy and Richard Tucker.

 


Message from the President

Shalom Temple family and friends,

I hope this message finds everyone safe and well! On August 7th, we started recording Shabbat video services back at our Temple with our new equipment. If you haven't had an opportunity to see it yet, please take a look on YouTube. I am sure you will enjoy it! I want to thank Joel Auerbach for helping us with the recording and editing of the videos. We are looking for volunteers to help with the Shabbat filming periodically. If you have expertise or interest in videography, please contact me to discuss it.

Rabbi Sternfield, Cantor Bard, and our Ritual Committee members are still hard at work preparing for our Virtual High Holy Day Services. We are putting together a very nice program for all to appreciate and watch at your convenience.

Recently, Fran Burday has accepted a TBE board position to Chair the Publicity Committee. Fran has had a very successful career in sales and marketing and has excellent communication skills. She brings a lot of enthusiasm to our Temple and we are all excited to have her on our team! Please join me in welcoming Fran as a new member of our board.

I am happy to announce that we will be hosting our 2nd TBE Zoom (Virtual) get together where everyone can see familiar faces and catch up. On Saturday, August 29th at 5:00 pm, we will have a brief Havdalah followed by a Happy Hour where everyone can sit with their wine and cheese (in front of your computer). I will be sending out the Zoom invitation the day before so please save the date and plan to join us. All you need to do is click on the link and follow the instructions.

Thank you all for hanging in there with us during these difficult times. As soon as there is a significant reduction in COVID-19 cases, we will try to reschedule some outside services. Please keep your spirits high. Brighter days lie ahead!

If anyone needs help, please let us know.

Stay Healthy and Stay Safe!

Ron Eiseman

President


OUR CALENDAR

High Holy Days

2020—5781

 

The health of our members and guests is of utmost importance to us. Therefore, in this difficult year we will be holding all services “virtually”, meaning that they will be prerecorded and put on YOUTUBE. Everyone is invited to observe the Holy Days with us. We will send you an easy-to-use link prior to Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. You will also be able to find the link on our web page (www.templebethelbradenton.org). You may attend our services on YouTube at times of your choosing, wherever you may be.

 

We hope that you will join us at this sacred Season!

 

Please call the Temple at 941-755-4900 and leave your name, address and email, so that we may send you the combined Prayerbook/Book of Remembrance for the High Holy Days. With this booklet you will be able to participate in our services, rather than just watch.

 

Erev Rosh Hashanah – Friday, September 18th  7 pm

Rosh Hashanah Day – Saturday, September 19th 10 am

Erev Yom Kippur (Kol Nidre) – Sunday, September 27th 7 pm

Yom Kippur Day and Yizkor – Monday, September 28th 10 am

 


Membership

I would like to ask all members to compose a small family history to add to each newsletter.  We have been unable to spend time with each other and this can be a way to meet a new friend or a nice reminder of a friend's background.

Membership in a synagogue represents a commitment to the community. It means that you are involved in keeping Jewish life alive and seeing it continue to the next generation. It also gives you a framework of giving and contributing to the Shul, and it means that you are a partner in supporting the financial needs of the Synagogue which we are all part of. If you are interested in joining Temple Beth El Bradenton, please contact our membership chair,

Helen Hammerman

Welcome New Members

B'ruchim HaBa'im" ! We are so happy that you are with us here at Temple Beth El!  We appreciate  your presence and welcome your active participation and look forward to getting to know you.  

Cantor Deborah Bard

* Calling all full time college and graduate students that would like to join the congregation… If you are a full time student 25 or under, you can belong to the synagogue for just $25 per year, yes per year! For more info  call the TBE office at 941-755-4900 and leave your name and phone number.

One way our members help those in need.

On Wednesday August 12th exactly 1year from the groundbreaking Temple Beth El, as part of an Interfaith Building Coalition, dedicated the beautiful home we all built for the Harris family. It was a labor of love and the beginning of many more homes to build.


Men's Club

There has been much talk in the news lately about Vote By Mail and the Postal Service.  I thought it would be helpful to explain how this all works in Manatee County.

 

First of all, you actually have until the week before the election to sign up to vote by mail.  Your sign up is good for 2 election cycles, and ballots start going out 30 days before the election.  You can sign up on line at http://www.votemanatee.com or by calling the Supervisor of Elections at 941-741-3823.  If you decide not to vote by mail after you sign up, you can turn in your ballot at your normal voting location, and vote there.  IN ORDER FOR A VOTE BY MAIL BALLOT TO BE COUNTED, IT MUST BE AT THE OFFICE OF THE SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS AT 7:00 PM ELECTION NIGHT.  You can check the status of your ballot at http://www.votemanatee.com.  This ability to check makes fraud a nonissue, along with the fact that there is a paper trail.

 

If you decide that you do not want your ballot to go through the mail, you can bring it to the Supervisor of Election's Office at 600 301 Blvd W Suite 108 34205.  There is a slot on the outside of the building, behind the flag pole, where you can safely turn in your ballot.

 

There are 264,000 registered voters in Manatee County.  125,000 voters are signed up to receive a vote by mail ballot.  These people are the most likely to actually vote.  That is why it is important to mail back your ballot as soon as you are able.  We have the power, and I would add responsibility, to prevent a log jam on election day.  And again, it is safe and easy to bypass the mail and deliver your ballot to the Supervisor of Elections.

 

This election is important to everyone.  It is necessary for all of us to vote safely.

 

Ken Handelman  Mens Club, President 


Hebrew and Religious School

Shalom to all!

Temple Beth El's religious school started Sunday, August 16, at 11:00 a.m. We all connected to Rabbi, on Zoom, and were graced with a hearty Welcome Back. Rabbi spoke to the students, Cantor DB led us all in a few songs and a short Havdalah, and then we left Zoom, and separated into smaller groups with the teachers, Debrorah Bard, Emily Mulholland, Rabbi Sternfield, and me, Susie Konicov. This was the time for Hebrew class, which lasted till 12:30.

It was a good beginning, and the children were eager to begin again.

 

L'Hitraot,

Susie Konicov

941-932-1636

swkonicov@gmail.com

If you know an unaffiliated Jewish family with young children, who is looking for a shul, please tell them about us! We want to build our religious school and are looking for more students.  The Jewish Education Loan Fund (JELF) provides interest free loans to Jewish students for college and graduate school. For further information go to their website:      http://JELF.org


Article of the Month

Jews and Psychology 

Erwin Segal, Ph.D

2020 

(Installment 1) 

            

            The Jewish influence on Psychology has been broad and pervasive. Jews have been instrumental in the creation and development of many of the systems and areas of psychology, and other fields of study, that have had direct influence on psychology. This Jewish influence seems to come from the very essence of Jewish scholars irrespective of their active religious affiliation. Consider two anecdotes. 1) I was the designated host for Jerry Bruner, who was the Psychology Department’s Distinguished Speaker around 2000. He told me about a discussion that he had with his friend Alexander Luria who was a distinguished psychologist from Russia, about the fact that even though neither of them had any involvement or interest in religion, both believed that their Jewish background strongly influenced their views and professional careers. 2) Sigmund Freud wrote that although he had abandoned the holy writ and all the common characteristics of his people, he still thought that much of his being was Jewish, ‘probably its very essence.’ 

            Two of the most interesting historical figures I know lays a foundation for our study. 

            Moses Maimonides (1138-1204), one of the most important Jewish biblical scholars in history, made critically important contributions to secular scientific study, thus Jewish scholars made important contributions to scientific scholarship by the twelfth century. 

Maimonides was a physician, philosopher, scientist, and theologian. He broke with Jewish educational tradition by adding secular subjects and texts to religious study. He argued that one should be facile in both logic and scientific observation before even attempting to understand the intricacies of Jewish history, theology, and philosophy. Maimonides argued that all claims (including religious ones) must be supported by reason and observation. He argued that if a claim even in a sacred text could not be supported by reason and observation, it must be interpreted metaphorically. He observed that there is often a hidden content beneath the literal one. Those who believe the bible to be literally true are idol worshippers, as literal interpretation of the inconsistencies in the biblical text requires rejection of rationality. Accepting irrational claims as true, requires treating the text as an object of veneration, rather than a source of knowledge, that is, an Idol. 

From Maimonides, Jews were given permission to study the world, and to give rational interpretations to what they find. All scientists, including Jewish social scientists, thus are given an open invitation to search for truth according to the guidelines of observation and reason. 

Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) was a Jewish-Dutch philosopher of Portuguese Sephardi origin. He was one of the primary contributors of the 17th C. Age of Reason and modern scientific philosophy. Spinoza strongly influenced Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, and Charles Darwin, the four unique 19th C scholars who together changed our understanding of the world. Spinoza’s views included modern conceptions of both the self and the universe. He came to be considered one of the great rationalists of 17th-century philosophy. 

Spinoza claimed that man, as is true about all organisms, has an active essence, conatus, a built-in drive to persist as an individual being. A person’s self includes the conatus. This interacts with our physical, social, and biological environment. Spinoza is the primary historical source of the idea that people are active organisms who strive to survive as living beings. Also, he argued that mind and body can both be studied scientifically. These principles are implicit in most modern psychology. 

             Spinoza would have been recognized much more prominently in history, except for the cultural and religious reaction to his theology. The positions that he took on God and nature were considered highly heretical. Spinoza argued that the dynamics of the world is self-contained, in that what occurs is a consequence of the intrinsic properties of the world and the laws of nature. The principle of sufficient reason that he held requires that these laws override any possible miracles by God for any reason. On July 27, 1656 the Talmud Torah congregation of Amsterdam issued a writ of cherem (Hebrew: חרם, a kind of ban, shunning, ostracism, expulsion, or excommunication) against the 23-year-old Spinoza. The cherem was to last forever, and as yet has not been revoked. 

Spinoza argued that nothing is supernatural. Everything that we have to say about physics, psychology and spirit are all different aspects of nature, which is in many ways synonymous with God. The world is a single coordinated infinite self-sustaining dynamic system with all parts interacting with one another. Everything about physics, psychology, and spirit are all different aspects of the same natural entity, nature, or God. Rational thought, starting from basic self-evident axioms, is Spinoza’s foundation that he deemed necessary for acquiring true knowledge. Complete knowledge, however, is impossible to attain as the logic is complex, and the factors that need to be considered for total understanding are infinite, and only God has access to all the factors. 


Smile of the Day

Abe Doesn’t Need Google

Herman and Abe are good friends at the Boca Sinai retirement residence and they are talking about Abe’s new purchase.

"I hear that you've just bought your very first computer, Abe. How are you enjoying it?”

“Oh it’s nice,” Abe replies.

“Have you tried out Google yet?" Herman asks. “It knows everything!”

“Haven’t had to,” replies Abe.

"Really?" says Herman.

“My wife Rachel already knows everything," replies Abe.


Yahrzeit Information

September 4th & 5th

Sempember 18th and 19th

David Meier IMO Aneliese Mai

Paul Stahl IMO Bertha Stahl

Bayla Kolton IMO Theodore Halasz

Jean Ellis IMO Jonas Ellis

Susan Koff IMO Roberta Gordon

September 25th and 26th

Lisa Leuchter IMO Elaine Roberts

Sandy Clark IMO Jacob Kleinman

Craig & Linda Hoffman IMO Sam Samsom

Barry Steiger IMO Sue Steiger

Arnold & Betty Klein IMO Howard Klein

Freda Koff IMO David Koff

September 11th and 12th

Brian Weiss IMO Pearl H. Weiss

David Karubian IMO Mike Karubian

Craig & Linda Hoffman IMO Lillian Hoffman

Itay Seith IMO Leone Sherrod Taylor Rumph

Lisa Leuchter IMO Richard Roberts

Julie Wolfe Moser IMO Evie Wolfe

 

Barry Schneider IMO Brenda Schneider

 

Jean Ellis IMO Sarah Ellis

 

Beverly Hurowitz IMO Tiby Breitstein

 

 

Barry Steiger IMO Ann Steiger

 

 


Donations

Thank you for supporting Temple Beth El with your donation. Please let us know if you would like your donation directed to a specific purpose.  Donate TBE

Temple Beth El would like to thank Philip Rosenblum, Henry Taplinger and Larry Cohen for their donations

Sisterhood = Challah and Oneg

YAHRZEIT/MEMORIAL PLAQUES

Temple Beth El yahrzeit plaques are now available for purchase. Purchase one for a loved one already deceased or purchase now for a future date. Plaques can be English and Hebrew or just English or just Hebrew. The cost is $250 per plaque. 

GENERAL DONATIONS

SPECIAL DONATIONS

CANTOR BARD's DISCRETIONARY FUND-

SIMCHA GRAM CARDS FOR BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY, GET WELL, OR CONGRATULATIONS and SYMPATHY CARDS

RABBI'S DISCRETIONARY FUND-

To make a donation, go to www.templebethelbradenton.org/Donate


  September Birthdays September Anniversaries
14 Diane Hart 2  Lionel and Pearl Friedman
15 Maggie Ozner 3  Barry and Jean Steiger
16 Craig Hoffman  
17  Mimi Givarz  
24 William Gregory  
25 Susan Kurtin  
25  Mitch Rubinstein  
27  Katherine Richmond  
30 Paul Stahl  

Simcha Grams

TBE sends Birthday, Anniversary, Bar/Bat Mitzvah and other celebration "Simcha Grams" to members in honor of their special day. This is a wonderful way to contribute to your Synagogue and to send your TBE family good wishes.

Names must be received at the office by the 20th of the month prior to the birthday, anniversary or special event. Include a note with your name(s),the name(s) of whom and what you are honoring and how you would like your signature on the card they will receive. The donation is $2.00 per name. In the memo area of your check write "simcha gram and mail to:

Temple Beth El, Attention: Simcha Gram,. 5150 Peridea Blvd. East, Bradenton, FL 34203.

If you wish to pay by credit card use the yellow "donate"button above or call the TBE office, 941-755-4900, give them the above information and your credit card authorization.

The card will be mailed to those individuals prior to their special day and your donation will be acknowledged in the newsletter.

If we have somehow overlooked your Simcha or made an error in printing the date, please accept our apologies and call the temple office at 941-755-4900 so that we may update our records.

Contact the Newsletter editor(Kevin Thomas) at yinfiss@hotmail.com

Office: 941-755-4900  Address: 5150 Peridia Blvd East, Bradenton, Fl. 34203

www.templebethelbradenton.orgwww.facebook.com/TBEBradenton


5150 Peridia Blvd E Bradenton, FL 34203 (941)-755-4900 The Temple Office

TBEBradentonFL@yahoo.com 

www.templebethelbradenton.org

www.facebook.com/TBEBradenton

 

Rabbi Michael Sternfield
Cantor Deborah Bard
Cantor Emeritus Alan Cohn
Religious Education Director Susie Konicov
President Ron Eiseman
Exec. Vice President Neil Clark
Treasurer Howard Hammerman
Secretary Bayla Kolton
VP of Membership Helen Hammerman
Immediate Past President Sandy Clark
Ritual Katherine Richmond
Security Gary Weinberg
Women of Beth El Bonnie Krasik
Men's Club Ken Handelman
Publicity Fran Burday

 

For Rabbi or Temple information or to RSVP for an event, please email TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com. The Office is located at Temple Beth El, 5150 Peridia Blvd E, Bradenton 34203. Please notate on your check what the monies are for ie: "donation", "dues". You can also find out information or RSVP to an event by going to www.templebethelbradenton.org/events .

Got pocket change? Remember Pushke money? Put your change each day in a ziplock bag, then bring the bag to the Temple as a donation. Every little bit helps! It is a great way to get the kids to contribute too!

 

"It is a Tree of Life to those who hold fast to it." Proverbs 3:18  Purchasing a leaf (or leaves) on our Tree of Life, is a wonderful way to mark and sanctify precious life events, such as: B'nai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, birth of a child or grandchild, birthdays, anniversaries, or any special occasion.  It is also a loving way to remember those who have gone before us. Call the TBE office for more info -941-755-4900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                

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Categories
Uncategorized

October 2020 Newsletter

 

A REFORM CONGREGATION  

5150 Peridia Blvd E. BRADENTON, FL 34203

www.TempleBethElBradenton.org
TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com     941-755-4900

Due to the COViD-19 Viral pandemic, live Shabbat Services are are cancelled until further notice.

Shabbat Services can be seen on youtube at Temple_Beth_El_Bradenton

 

 

NEWS AND VIEWS

BY RABBI MICHAEL STERNFIELD

Dear friends,

On the very eve of this most unusual and bewildering Rosh Hashana, we received the deeply saddening word that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had died. As I write this column, Justice Ginsburg has not yet been laid to rest. (So, I hope you will understand that I am writing about what is about to take place.) She will be buried beside the love of her life, her dear husband Martin at Arlington National Cemetery. Her casket will lie in state upon the Lincoln catafalque, first at the Supreme Court and then in the Rotunda of the United States Capitol. She will be the first woman ever so honored by the nation and only the second Justice of the Supreme Court. What a touching and completely appropriate tribute to that tiny but mighty woman who, by virtue of her wisdom, determination and vision, changed America forever. It is impossible to underestimate the immensity of her contributions to our nation. Every woman and girl in America, now and into the future, will be the beneficiary of the greatness of the notorious RBG.

 

So many of us wished that she could have lived forever, or at least through the upcoming election, as was her hope. Her death has left a void in the Supreme Court and in the conscience of our nation.  It is not likely to be filled soon or perhaps ever. It has been said that what Justice Thurgood Marshall was to people of color, Justice Ginsburg was to the women and girls of America.

 

We, the Jewish people, are incredibly proud that she was one of us. more important than her Jewish identity or her Brooklyn neighborhood of origin, the ideals that shaped her life came directly from our Jewish heritage of justice. What made her so much more than a famous Jewish woman is that she personified Judaism’s highest values, the belief in the equality of all people, the ceaseless pursuit of justice Although all members of the Supreme Court are referred to as Justice, this word deserves to be her first name.

 

How can America best pay its respects to this remarkable woman? There have already been two films made about her. There will be many books, including her own words. Law students will read her decisions and will use her precedents to argue future cases. There will be a statue created and placed in Brooklyn. Eventually that statue will become part of the New York landscape, invariably unnoticed by most of future generations. Pigeons will rest on that statue. But I doubt that would bother her in the least. She would probably find it humorous.

 

However, I do know what would disturb her immeasurably, namely if her successor will not be committed to the fight for full equality for women: equal pay for equal work, reproductive choice, the preservation of Roe v Wade, maternity leave and paternity leave too. Should whomever be nominated will not be as committed to these principles, then whatever posthumous honors may be bestowed on her will matter little. As I said in my sermon of September 25th, for an opponent of these hard-fought rights to be nominated and/or confirmed as the next Justice of the United States Supreme Court would be the equivalent of spitting on Justice Ginsburg’s grave.

 

This must not be allowed to happen. Our immeasurable debt to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg here and now is “to move heaven and earth” to make sure that her successor will be faithful to her steadfast principles.. Regardless of who wins this election, it is of utmost importance to this nation and future generations that the individual to whom such great trust will be bestowed will stand proudly and courageously on the shoulders of Justice Ginsburg. This is the best way to honor her memory. This in the only way to honor her memory. May she rest in the peace she so richly deserves.

Rabbi Michael P. Sternfield


Music

Cantor Bard

Maddie’s homemade apple challah cake ! 

Special for the New Year and for Succot !

Created by one of our 6 th grade students , Maddie O.  with her sister Sydney and mom Ruth !

Yummmm..

Here’s to a sweet year and a fruitful Succot !

“Etz Chayim “It is a Tree of Life"  How beautiful to see the blossomed etrog tree, lovingly planted by our students last year on Tu B’Shvat, new year of the trees!

 

“Looking  to the new year ahead when, God, and the Art of Science, -willing we can altogether rise and shine in song, sweet harmony ..For real!”

"Those who sing, pray twice." (Talmud)

Fruit Compote(Sweet for Sukkot)

The first fruits of the season cooked in syrup are a popular Sephardic dessert for the end of Yom Kippur and the beginning of Sukkot. This dish can be made a few days ahead of the holiday.

You'll need:

1 cup sugar                                        saucepan

3 cups water                                      wooden mixing spoon

1 teaspoon cinnamon                        measuring cup

1/4 teasoon ground cloves                    and spoons

juice of 1 lemon                                 peeler

8 firm apples, pears or plums           sharp knife

2 teaspoons vanilla                          glass bowl

 

1. Combine sugar, water, cinnamon, cloves and lemon juice in a large saucepan.  Bring to a boil, stirring constantly.

2. Boil mixture for 15 minutes. Lower to a simmer.

3. Peel fruits. Cut into quarters and remove cores.

4. Add fruit to saucepan. And cook for 7 minutes.

5. Remove saucepan from heat. Stir in vanilla.

6. Transfer to glass bowl and store in fridge.

Serves 6


Message from the President

Shalom Temple family and friends,

I hope everyone is healthy and safe! By now, many of you have had the opportunity to participate in our Rosh Hashana Video Services. I hope you enjoyed them and were able to share the links with anyone interested. For your convenience, the links will remain on YouTube for quite some time. I want to thank Rabbi Sternfield, Cantor Bard, Kate Richmond, and her Ritual committee members for all their hard work preparing the HHD Video Services. Also, I want to thank Joel Auerbach for his help with the recording and editing of the videos. We are still looking for volunteers to help with the Shabbat filming periodically. If you have the expertise or sincere interest in videography, please contact me to discuss it.

I am happy to announce that we will be hosting another TBE Zoom (Virtual) get together where everyone can see familiar faces and catch up. On Saturday, October 10th at 5:00 pm, we will have a brief Havdalah followed by a Happy Hour where everyone can sit with their wine and cheese (in front of your computer). I will be sending out the Zoom invitation the day before so please save the date and plan to join us. All you need to do is click on the link and follow the instructions.

Over the next few months, TBE will be upgrading our website and adding more content to share. If you have any suggestions on what topics you would like to see added, please let us know. Also, your Temple Board will be discussing other virtual programs to keep all of us connected. Last but not least, our board will be discussing some possibilities of reopening our temple for Shabbat services and Religious school. I will provide an update to you in a separate communication soon.

Thank you all for your continued support during these difficult times. If anyone needs help, please let us know.

 

Shanah Tovah,

Ron Eiseman

President


OUR CALENDAR

High Holy Days

2020—5781

 

The health of our members and guests is of utmost importance to us. Therefore, in this difficult year we will be holding all services “virtually”, meaning that they will be prerecorded and put on YOUTUBE. Everyone is invited to observe the Holy Days with us. We will send you an easy-to-use link prior to Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. You will also be able to find the link on our web page (www.templebethelbradenton.org). You may attend our services on YouTube at times of your choosing, wherever you may be.

 

We hope that you will join us at this sacred Season!

 

Please call the Temple at 941-755-4900 and leave your name, address and email, so that we may send you the combined Prayerbook/Book of Remembrance for the High Holy Days. With this booklet you will be able to participate in our services, rather than just watch.

 

Erev Yom Kippur (Kol Nidre) – Sunday, September 27th 7 pm

Yom Kippur Day and Yizkor – Monday, September 28th 10 am

Havdalah-Shmooze and Get-Together – Saturday, October 10 th 5 pm Zoom 


Membership

I would like to ask all members to compose a small family history to add to each newsletter.  We have been unable to spend time with each other and this can be a way to meet a new friend or a nice reminder of a friend's background.

Membership in a synagogue represents a commitment to the community. It means that you are involved in keeping Jewish life alive and seeing it continue to the next generation. It also gives you a framework of giving and contributing to the Shul, and it means that you are a partner in supporting the financial needs of the Synagogue which we are all part of. If you are interested in joining Temple Beth El Bradenton, please contact our membership chair,

Helen Hammerman

Welcome New Members

B'ruchim HaBa'im" ! We are so happy that you are with us here at Temple Beth El!  We appreciate  your presence and welcome your active participation and look forward to getting to know you.  

Cantor Deborah Bard

* Calling all full time college and graduate students that would like to join the congregation… If you are a full time student 25 or under, you can belong to the synagogue for just $25 per year, yes per year! For more info  call the TBE office at 941-755-4900 and leave your name and phone number.


Men's Club

The Salvation Army Mitzvah Project is on hold while we celebrate the High Holy Days and Sukkot. I want to take this opportunity to thank all of you who have taken part in the program.  The number of participants and generosity

with both time and resources has been unbelievable.  Even though we are apart, we have managed to work as one unit.  I look forward to making more sandwiches.  Our next date will be October 8.  I will send out an email as

the date approaches.  Thank you all again.  It has been my pleasure to work with you.

Ken Handelman, Men's Club President


Article of the Month

The pandemic's first High Holiday season has synagogues wondering: Will people pay dues?  By Ben Sales 

Like many synagogues, Temple B'nai Hayim used to rely on the High Holiday season to survive financially.

The small Conservative synagogue in Southern California would receive the lion's share of its revenue in the run-up to the holidays: Members sent in their annual dues, which included entry to High Holiday services, and non-members purchased tickets just for the High Holidays.

But with the option of holding regular in-person High Holiday services off the table due to the coronavirus, the synagogue is anticipating a decline in revenue this year and responding by reimagining its financial model from the ground up. Going forward, as long as congregants give any contribution, they get access to everything the synagogue offers: High Holiday services, a bar/bat mitzvah ceremony, even religious school – virtually for now, someday in person. Annual membership dues, which once cost $2,000 per two-parent household, will be abolished.

"We know a lot of people are hurting, and even if they give us a penny, we know they are a true friend," said Rabbi Jason van Leeuwen, the synagogue's cantor. He added: "We should be worried, and I don't think we should reasonably expect this new model to cover all of our expenses."

Across the country, synagogues are bracing for a significant reduction in revenues. Though many are seeing increased attendance at virtual services, without the annual cash infusion that in-person High Holiday services bring, and with community members under financial pressure, congregations across the denominational spectrum aren't sure how they'll make ends meet this year.

"They're expecting that their revenue will be down, in some ways, for the next year," said Amy Asin, the Union for Reform Judaism's vice president for strengthening congregations.

"Congregations are places, now more than they have been in the past, where people want to belong," she said. "That doesn't mean that they're in a financial position to pay what they've paid in the past."

Adas Israel, a 1,700-member Conservative synagogue in Washington, D.C., is expecting a 20% drop in revenue this year even as it has seen a spike in attendance at its online services. One recent Friday evening service had about 1,600 screens tuned in – or nearly one for each member household.

To keep congregants comfortable, the synagogue is not planning to increase its annual dues this year, which can run to more than $3,000. And it's also hoping to save on expenses it no longer has, like food for kiddush after services. But whether Adas Israel can avoid any layoffs among its 170 employees as the synagogue moves into an unprecedented future remains unclear.

"My crystal ball broke a long time ago," said Laurie Aladjem, the congregation's president. "I believe that many of our members join and affiliate with Adas Israel not just for the High Holidays. We have a really robust education department both for children and adults. We have a preschool. We have a religious school that is bursting at the seams. We have really robust adult education programming."

For many U.S. synagogues, a fixed yearly membership payment has usually included a High Holiday ticket, with nonmembers paying for a seat for the Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services. (Discounts on fees are often reduced based on need, and few synagogues actively turn away those who want to attend services.) Because so many people generally pack the sanctuary on those days, the holidays are often the driver of synagogue revenue.

That's true across denominations, though it's especially pronounced in non-Orthodox congregations. Congregation Rodeph Shalom, a large Reform synagogue in Philadelphia, would get 150 or 200 people at its Friday night service – and 10 times that number on the night of Yom Kippur. Beth Jacob Congregation, an Orthodox synagogue in Beverly Hills, California, sees as many as four times its normal Shabbat attendance on the Day of Atonement.

"We hope people understand that when they are buying a High Holiday ticket, what they're really doing is supporting the synagogue in its ability to exist throughout the year," said Rabbi Jacob Blumenthal, CEO of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism and the Conservative Rabbinical Assembly.

On the whole, High Holiday revenue is less critical to synagogues than it used to be, according to Rabbi Daniel Judson, one of the authors of a 2016 UJA-Federation study which found that 57 synagogues nationwide had eliminated annual dues entirely and now just ask for donations. As more synagogues are making their High Holiday services free, they are less dependent on the revenue they once generated.

Judson said, however, that those who donate to synagogues around this time of year do so regardless of the fee structure, and this year will likely be tough going. Historically, he said, for a medium-size synagogue, 60% of annual revenue comes from annual dues.

"I think synagogues are less dependent on High Holiday revenue than they've ever been before," said Judson, dean of graduate leadership programs at Hebrew College near Boston. "But it's still part of the regular calendar that people pay their dues so that they're ready for the High Holidays."

Orthodox synagogues may have an advantage, as surveys show that Orthodox Jews are more likely to attend synagogue regularly rather than just for the High Holidays. Still, Orthodox synagogues may see a drop in revenue, said Rabbi Adir Posy, the Orthodox Union's director of synagogue and community services. That issue, he said, could be particularly pronounced in large cities with big Orthodox communities, where families may bounce between synagogues and not feel a particular connection to one congregation.

"A larger percentage of our membership have robust connections to communal activity through the shuls throughout the whole year, so it's a conversation that is not waking up for the weeks before the High Holidays," Posy, an associate rabbi at Beth Jacob in Beverly Hills, said in discussing Orthodox synagogues in general. "That being said, we are seeing synagogues that are getting a lot more membership forms mailed back with associate memberships or limited things."

Rodeph Shalom, the Reform synagogue in Philadelphia, has three membership tiers for its 1,000 members, and also allows for reductions if needed. It's maintaining that system, but plans to make its livestream High Holiday services open to the public for free.

Senior Rabbi Jill Maderer said she isn't sure what the lack of High Holiday tickets will mean for the synagogue's bottom line, but believes that opening the prayers to the public is the right choice this year.

"We feel this is an opportunity to recognize people's spiritual needs across the community, and to open our tent to the broader community," she said. "I am concerned, and I am also extremely curious, as to whether people will show the commitment without that stick hanging over them. And I'm not afraid. I really believe in the community."


Smile of the Day

A Speedy-ish Recovery

Rabbi Kozlowky gets sick and is admitted to Cedars-Sinai Hospital for treatment. A few days after he is admitted, Max, the shul's secretary, goes to visit him.

"Rabbi," says Max, "I'm here on behalf of our Board of Trustees. They have asked me to bring you their good wishes for a speedy recovery and their hope that you should live to be 120."

"Thank you," says Rabbi Gold, "I'm pleased to hear of their good wishes for me."

"And so you should be, Rabbi," says Max, "it was touch and go for a while but the final vote on whether we should send you any good wishes ended up 11 to 9 in your favor."

 


Yahrzeit Information

October 2nd and 3rd

October 16th and 17th  

Michelle & Jose Torres IMO Helene Schneider

David Meier IMO Karl Heinz Mai

 

Paul Stahl IMO Rita Lewandoski

Anna Bever IMO Norma Neiman  

Jean Shames IMO Abraham Shames

October 23rd and 24th  

October 9th and 10th

Bayla Kolton IMO Evalyne Halasz

 

Jeanne Shames IMO James Dunne

Celia Strickler IMO Nathaniel Strickler

 

Susie Konicov IMO Rosa Halberstadt

Paul Stahl IMO Helen Slater

 

Marlena Johnsky IMO Florence Harris

Marlena Johnsky IMO Norman Harris

 

Anna Bever IMO Tewel Neiman

October 30th and 31st  
 

Ron Adelson IMO Julius Adelson

 

Sharon Carlson IMO Edward Ger

 

 


Donations

Thank you for supporting Temple Beth El with your donation. Please let us know if you would like your donation directed to a specific purpose.  Donate TBE

Sisterhood = Challah and Oneg

YAHRZEIT/MEMORIAL PLAQUES

Temple Beth El yahrzeit plaques are now available for purchase. Purchase one for a loved one already deceased or purchase now for a future date. Plaques can be English and Hebrew or just English or just Hebrew. The cost is $250 per plaque. 

GENERAL DONATIONS

Freda Koff, Bonnie Krasik, Jean Ellis, Beverly Saffron, Kate Richmond, Brian Weiss, Susie Konicov, Ron & Robin Eiseman, Allen Cohn and Marlena Johnsky

SPECIAL DONATIONS

CANTOR BARD's DISCRETIONARY FUND-

SIMCHA GRAM CARDS FOR BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY, GET WELL, OR CONGRATULATIONS and SYMPATHY CARDS

RABBI'S DISCRETIONARY FUND-

To make a donation, go to www.templebethelbradenton.org/Donate


  October Birthdays

October Anniversaries

3 Joy Shames

30 Lisa and Joshua Leuchter
 

10 Brian Lipka  
15 Robert Sokol  
19 Micah Metcalf-Clark  
25 Daniel Muraskin  
26 Erwin Segal  
29  Stephanie Peshek  
     

Simcha Grams

TBE sends Birthday, Anniversary, Bar/Bat Mitzvah and other celebration "Simcha Grams" to members in honor of their special day. This is a wonderful way to contribute to your Synagogue and to send your TBE family good wishes.

Names must be received at the office by the 20th of the month prior to the birthday, anniversary or special event. Include a note with your name(s),the name(s) of whom and what you are honoring and how you would like your signature on the card they will receive. The donation is $2.00 per name. In the memo area of your check write "simcha gram and mail to:

Temple Beth El, Attention: Simcha Gram,. 5150 Peridea Blvd. East, Bradenton, FL 34203.

If you wish to pay by credit card use the yellow "donate"button above or call the TBE office, 941-755-4900, give them the above information and your credit card authorization.

The card will be mailed to those individuals prior to their special day and your donation will be acknowledged in the newsletter.

If we have somehow overlooked your Simcha or made an error in printing the date, please accept our apologies and call the temple office at 941-755-4900 so that we may update our records.

Contact the Newsletter editor(Kevin Thomas) at yinfiss@hotmail.com

Office: 941-755-4900  Address: 5150 Peridia Blvd East, Bradenton, Fl. 34203

www.templebethelbradenton.orgwww.facebook.com/TBEBradenton


5150 Peridia Blvd E Bradenton, FL 34203 (941)-755-4900 The Temple Office

TBEBradentonFL@yahoo.com 

www.templebethelbradenton.org

www.facebook.com/TBEBradenton

 

Rabbi Michael Sternfield
Cantor Deborah Bard
Cantor Emeritus Alan Cohn
Religious Education Director Susie Konicov
President Ron Eiseman
Exec. Vice President Neil Clark
Treasurer Howard Hammerman
Secretary Bayla Kolton
VP of Membership Helen Hammerman
Immediate Past President Sandy Clark
Ritual Katherine Richmond
Board Member at Large Gary Weinberg
Women of Beth El Bonnie Krasik
Men's Club Ken Handelman

 

For Rabbi or Temple information or to RSVP for an event, please email TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com. The Office is located at Temple Beth El, 5150 Peridia Blvd E, Bradenton 34203. Please notate on your check what the monies are for ie: "donation", "dues". You can also find out information or RSVP to an event by going to www.templebethelbradenton.org/events .

Got pocket change? Remember Pushke money? Put your change each day in a ziplock bag, then bring the bag to the Temple as a donation. Every little bit helps! It is a great way to get the kids to contribute too!

 

"It is a Tree of Life to those who hold fast to it." Proverbs 3:18  Purchasing a leaf (or leaves) on our Tree of Life, is a wonderful way to mark and sanctify precious life events, such as: B'nai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, birth of a child or grandchild, birthdays, anniversaries, or any special occasion.  It is also a loving way to remember those who have gone before us. Call the TBE office for more info -941-755-4900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                

                                                                                                                                                           *This ad is not a political endorsement

   

 

 

 

 

 

                          

 

 

 

 

 

                                              

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

                                                                                                                                                       

 


                                                                                                                                                                 

Categories
Uncategorized

June 2020

 

A REFORM CONGREGATION  

5150 Peridia Blvd E. BRADENTON, FL 34203

www.TempleBethElBradenton.org
TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com     941-755-4900

Shabbat Services are every Friday night at 7:00 pm
Saturday morning at 10 am followed by Torah Study

Due to the COViD-19 Viral pandemic, live Shabbat Services are are cancelled until further notice.

Shabbat Services can be seen on youtube at Temple_Beth_El_Bradenton

 

  •  

NEWS AND VIEWS

BY RABBI MICHAEL STERNFIELD

 

Dear friends,

I would like to use this monthly column to familiarize you with a small but significant controversy in Israel. It raises a most intriguing question for Jews everywhere.

 

An evangelical broadcaster that airs Christian programs in Israel is at risk of being shut down. The reason? The channel appears to be trying to get Jews to become Christians. The channel, called “GOD TV,” has put both Israel and its evangelical Christian supporters in a difficult position. It has also shown tensions between the two groups that have long been ignored.

Israel has been inclined to ignore any possible hidden goal the group has to convert Jewish people. Israel has long accepted evangelicals’ political and financial support. They are especially devoted to AIPAC. American Evangelicals are strong supporters of Israel largely because they see Israel as a predictor of the second coming of Jesus and the end of days.

Still, most Jews rightly see any effort to convert us to Christianity as deeply offensive.

“GOD TV” is known as “Shelanu” in Israel. It broadcasts in the Hebrew language, even though most Christians in Israel speak Arabic. It describes itself as making shows for Christians and began airing programs about three weeks ago.

Ahead of the channel’s launch, “GOD TV,” its head Ward Simpson made a video announcement. In it, critics say, he spoke of the channel’s real goal: to convert Jews to Christianity. Simpson said God was letting him take Christianity into the home of Jews. “They’ll watch secretly, they’ll watch quietly,” he said. “God is removing the blindness from their eyes.” That video has since been taken down. Simpson said "GOD TV" has no plans to go off the air in Israel. “We love Israel,” he said and we have no reason to doubt this.

 

You may not be aware of this but freedom of religion is an important part of Israeli law. Proselytizing is permitted as long as the efforts do not involve money or people under the age of 18.

Mr. Simpson denies trying to convert Jews to Christianity. But he also said Jews who accept Jesus as the messiah can continue to practice their faith. I am sure he was is alluding to “Messianic Jews,” also known as “Jews for Jesus.” All branches of Judaism agree that Messianic Jews are not Jews at all. Though some are of Jewish descent, Israel considers them to be converts to another religion.

Ah, what to do about these Messianic Jews? Such congregations exist all across our country, including right here. One of the Christian broadcasting networks continuously airs programming whose undeniable purpose is to convince Jews that they can remain Jewish while still accepting Jesus at the Messiah.

I have no desire to shut down this kind of programming in our own country primarily. Judaism can easily weather any attempt to win us over. Whether they should be permitted to do so in Israel, and in Hebrew no less, strikes me as pretty chutzpadik. Still, if Israel does respect freedom of religion, then I suppose they ought to be allowed to continue.

But an intriguing question remains. Can one remain a Jew and embrace Jesus? Let’s face it: Jesus was Jewish. His early followers were Jews. All of them undoubtedly practiced Judaism, the last supper being an obvious example of how they observed Pesach (even though the last supper was not a seder, per se.) Early on the followers of Jesus were more a branch of the Jewish people than a totally separate religion. The heart of the dilemma is what Evangelicals mean when they claim that Jews can remain Jewish while accepting Jesus.

Yes, we can easily accept that Jesus existed and that he had a profound impact. We should have no problem accepting that Jesus was a historic personality, a charismatic Jewish teacher, a rabbi or even a kind of a prophet. Most of his moral teachings were mirror images of mainstream Jewish teachings. But to accept that Jesus was the Messiah, the physical embodiment of God, is where we part company.

We are still praying for the arrival of the Messianic age. From all appearances, our world still has a long way until we arrive at Messianic perfection. So until then, thank you for your concern for our salvation. But I think we will stick with Judaism while respecting their right to believe and even proselytize as they wish. I am confident that Israelis overwhelmingly will be more amused than threatened by God TV.

Shalom,

Rabbi Michael P. Sternfield


Music

Cantor Bard

"Those who sing, pray twice." (Talmud)

Voice! The gift we all possess! If you love to sing (more or less on pitch) and have a musical ear in ensemble, then the congregational choir is for you! For more information: please contact Cantor Bard (773-484-8149)

TBE_Choir

 


Message from the President

Shalom Temple family and friends,

As always, the TBE board and Religious leaders hope that you and your loved ones are staying safe and following all the necessary guidelines. We also hope that you are enjoying our online services as we stay sheltered. We are now in the process of evaluating how and when we will be able to come back together at our temple home to observe Shabbat services.

The Security Preparedness Committee members are working on a specific action plan to ensure everyone’s safety when it is appropriate to reopen our doors. Of course, Temple Beth El will be following all CDC guidelines at that time. The Phone Tree Committee continues to call all members and I am encouraging everyone to let us know if you need help.

 

With regards to the High Holy Days, we are looking into different venues so that we can observe safely. Once we decide on a plan, if there are members still unsure of coming to the temple, please know that Rabbi Sternfield and Cantor Bard will continue to record services for you to observe at home. Also, we will be implementing a new online program offering Saturday Torah services where you can participate remotely.

 

In closing, I want to thank all of you for your patience and support as we work through these challenging times. I am very confident that our Temple family will be much stronger when we return.

Stay Healthy and Stay Safe!

Ron Eiseman

President


span class="tbe_header">OUR CALENDAR

In line with recommendations from the CDC, Temple Beth El will not hold any services, meetings or special events until further notice. Please stay healthy and safe. You will be notified of any updates.


MEMBERSHIP

Membership in a synagogue represents a commitment to the community. It means that you are involved in keeping Jewish life alive and seeing it continue to the next generation. It also gives you a framework of giving and contributing to the Shul, and it means that you are a partner in supporting the financial needs of the Synagogue which we are all part of. If you are interested in joining Temple Beth El Bradenton, please contact our membership chair,

Helen Hammerman

 

 

Welcome New Members

B'ruchim HaBa'im" ! We are so happy that you are with us here at Temple Beth El!  We appreciate  your presence and welcome your active participation and look forward to getting to know you.  

Cantor Deborah Bard

* Calling all full time college and graduate students that would like to join the congregation… If you are a full time student 25 or under, you can belong to the synagogue for just $25 per year, yes per year! For more info  call the TBE office at 941-755-4900 and leave your name and phone number.


MENS CLUB NEWS

It is time to start thinking about 2020-2021 Men's Club Membership. 

This last year, half of the Temple's male members joined the Men's Club.  That response was better than what we normally get. I would like to take this opportunity to pitch membership to all the men of Beth El.

People tell me that they don't join the Men's Club because most of our activities take place on Sunday.  Some people believe, that as Temple members, they are entitled to participate in all Men's Club activities whether or not they join the Men's Club.  This, by the way, is true. So why join?

The way our Temple is structured, essential Temple operations are performed by the Men's Club (and Sisterhood).  There is no Ways and Means Chair on the Temple Board, for example, because Temple fundraising is the responsibility of the Men's Club.  Along with fundraising, the Men's Club provides the Temple membership with outings, social activities, mitzvah projects, and whatever support is needed.  When you go to the Temple on the High Holidays, and find the room set up, you can be sure that the Men's Club was there. 

We cannot do any of this without the operating expenses that come from dues.  We do not raise any money for ourselves: what we raise goes directly to the Temple.  We were able to have the Italian fundraiser this year, because Men's Club dues enabled us to cover the cost of the meal. 

The bottom line is that even if you don't attend our meetings and events, as a Temple member, you benefit from the Men's Club.  The Temple could not do the things it does without a functioning Men's Club.  That is why, when contacted about membership, it is so important that you join. 

 

Ken Handelman  Mens Club, President 


Women of Beth El

If you're not a member, come and try us out! 

We are alone….Together! Nothing stops our wonderful “Women of Beth El” from performing Mitzvahs. Not even a Pandemic! A special salute to the following WBE members who have teamed up to become the Temple “Phone Tree:” Jean Ellis, Linda Hoffman, Marlena Johnsky, Beverly Safron, Carol Segal, Florence Shulman, & Kate Richmond. Plus our Men’s Club President & supporter Ken Handleman. Together they reach out their branches to the entire congregation every week. Their many friendly phone calls make sure we are all safe and connected.

 

Bonnie Krasik "Women of Beth El", President

bkrasik@aol.com (248) 661-4583


Hebrew and Religious School

The Temple Beth El Religious School students chose, as their Mitzvah project of the year,

 to support the Heifer International Program. Heifer International works in the areas of livestock and agriculture to develop programs that alleviate hunger and poverty. They have a field staff of livestock specialists and their programs are considered among the most successful in the world.

 

The kids raised $142 and bought, for Heifer, the following:

$10 – towards a goat

$60 – a trio of rabbits

$30 – Honeybees

$20 – a Flock of Chicks

$20 – Ducks/Geese

 

$2 left over that will be added to money ($8) earned at our booth at the Sisterhood Fair, last fall, for groceries being collected by TBE for the Food Bank.

 

Rabbi addressed and taught our students Sunday, May 24 for the last day of Religious School for the year,

 

We expect and hope to see all the students again next fall.

 

Shalom, Susie Konicov

TBE Education Chair, and teacher

swkonicov@gmail.com

If you know an unaffiliated Jewish family with young children, who is looking for a shul, please tell them about us! We want to build our religious school and are looking for more students.  

The Jewish Education Loan Fund (JELF) provides interest free loans to Jewish students for college and graduate school. For further information go to their website:      http://JELF.org


The Treasurer's Corner

 

We applied for and received a $10,832 loan through the Federal Payroll Protection program. It will be turned into a grant once we show that the money was used to pay our rabbi and cantor during the months that we were shut down due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We will use part of the money to upgrade the equipment we use to record and broadcast our services.

 

We can now accept both donations and regular dues payment through direct debit from checking accounts. Donations can be accepted in this way on-line. If you would like your monthly dues to come out of your checking account, please contact me.

 

As we near the end of our fiscal year, it is time to look at our actual financials results in comparison to the budget formulated twelve months ago.

FY 2019-2020
Budgeted and Actual Revenue and Expenses
Projected
  Budget Actual Difference
Revenue 138,926 146,874 7,948
Expense 123,984 126,983 2,999
Total 14,942 19,891 4,949

 

While our expenses increased by 2 percent, our revenue increased by almost 6 percent. As a result, our next surplus will be about one-third higher than estimated a year ago.

 

We are grateful to all members and guests who have made donations and who plan to make donations in the coming year. We are also grateful to the Sarasota-Manatee Jewish Federation who paid half of the improvements to our Temple’s security. Please consider including Temple Beth El in your estate plans.

 

The recently passed Federal CARES act increased the limit of charitable contributions from 60% of adjusted gross income to 100% for taxpayers who itemize. And you can carry forward contributions greater than the limit for five years. Taxpayers who do not itemize and give money to charitable institutions, can take up to $300 for individuals and $600 for joint returns as an adjustment against adjusted gross income. That will reduce tax liability by the marginal tax rate. Please check with your tax advisor.

 

During the past year we sold the last of the cemetery plots that we had previously purchased. It only makes sense to buy plots five at a time. If you are interested in spending the afterlife with other members of the Temple, please let Sandy Clark know. She is keeping a list.

Howard Hammerman
Treasurer
410-430-3019


Article of the Month

What Ruth Can Teach Us About Celebrating Shavuot

BY RABBI SALEM PEARCE

Ruth and Naomi

In preparation for God’s appearance on Mount Sinai, Moses and the Israelite people “stood at the foot of the mountain” Exodus 19:17 waiting to see and to hear what transpires.

The unusual preposition — be-tachtit (“at the foot of”) — is understood in the Midrash to mean that the Jewish people were literally standing under the mountain. That is, at the moment God speaks the Ten Commandments, God also uproots Mount Sinai from the ground and holds it over the people, as if to say, “If you accept the Torah, fine; if not, here shall be your grave.” Avodah Zarah 2b. The implication is that the Jewish people accepted Torah only through coercion.

The description of the ensuing events only reinforces that interpretation. The thunder, lightning, and thick clouds that accompany God’s presence on Mount Sinai terrify the people Exodus 20:14 and they beg Moses to be their intercessor.

Many Jewish communities will commemorate this moment during the holiday of Shavuot. The event is often referred to as z’man matan torateinu (“the time of the giving of our Torah”) and some celebrate its anniversary by staying up all night in study. But given both the biblical and rabbinic understanding of that moment, we may well wonder about the celebration of a “gift” both forced and fear-inducing.

Another Shavuot custom may provide some insight: the recitation of the Book of Ruth, which many communities read on the second day of the holiday.

The short story revolves around the deep relationship between the heroine and her Bethlehemite mother-in-law, Naomi, forged after the death of the latter’s husband and two sons. As she journeys back home, Naomi urges her daughter-in-law to stay in her native Moab, but Ruth refuses, speaking these iconic words: “For wherever you go, I will go; wherever you lodge, I will lodge; your people shall be my people, and your God, my God” Ruth 1:16.

These words can be read in dialogue with the story in Exodus. They certainly show no less commitment than the joint affirmation of the Israelites at Sinai: “All that the Lord has spoken we will do, and obey.” Exodus 24:7. Indeed, Ruth’s declaration is understood as evidence of her taking the covenant upon herself. In the rabbinic imagination, she becomes the prototypical convert. Just as the Jewish people all gathered together at the mountain in the desert in the presence of the God of Israel, so too does Ruth cling to Naomi on the road in Moab, invoking the God of Israel

 

But the contexts are very different. The animating value in the book of Ruth is chesed (loving kindness) and loyalty that surpass the simple duty implied in the Israelites’ dispassionate response of na’aseh v’nishma (“we will do and obey”). After all, Ruth’s pledge to Naomi ends with the ultimate vow: “Where you die, I will die, and there I will be buried” Ruth 1:17. Later in the book, Naomi returns her daughter-in-law’s care and concern, the wealthy landowner Boaz shows kindness and generosity to both women, and all three find joy in the birth of Obed.

Even God is different. In Exodus, God is a loud, physical force that moves mountains. In the book of Ruth, God is the quiet but inexorable activity that moves the characters from emptiness to fulfillment.

It is perhaps for this reason that there is a practice of saying Ruth’s words each morning when laying tefillin, her credo of devotion and faithfulness recited as the boxes are placed between the eyes and on the arm — literally taking the words of Torah upon oneself. The ritual conjures the image of Ruth speaking to Naomi as they journey, each having lost her husband, two women cleaving to each other in hope for a better future together. It is an act of making oneself a partner in God’s ongoing work in the world.

Ruth’s relationship to Naomi and to Torah can be a model for our own orientation to the celebration of Shavuot. In Exodus, the Israelites experience an overwhelming display of power and might that leaves them shaking in fear and desiring to distance themselves from what may emerge from those clouds around the mountain. In the book of Ruth, she — no less in the dark — bravely and wholeheartedly faces what may come down the road.

Shavuot is called “the time of the giving of the Torah” rather than “the time of the receiving of the Torah.” The sages point out that the giving took place on one day to one people, but the receiving takes place at all times and in all generations.

As we celebrate the giving of the Torah on Shavuot, may we may act each day with the love and intimacy modeled by Ruth in the receiving of Torah.


Voting by mail

Per a wonderful sugestion by Marion, we have included information on how to vote by mail. More information can be found here https://dos.myflorida.com/elections/for-voters/voting/vote-by-mail/

 

Vote-by-mail refers to voting a ballot received by mail or picked up by or for a voter instead of going to the polls to vote during early voting period or Election Day. Except on Election Day, no excuse is needed to vote a vote-by-mail ballot (see Who Can Pick Up a Vote-by-Mail Ballot below). Unless otherwise specified, a request to receive a vote-by-mail ballot covers all elections through the end of the calendar year for the second ensuing regularly scheduled general election. A vote-by-mail ballot that is returned undeliverable cancels a request for future elections and must be renewed.

How to Request a Vote-by-Mail Ballot Be Mailed

A request for a vote-by-mail ballot may be made in one of the following ways:

  • To request a ballot online, here are links for each county  votemanatee.com, or sarasotavotes.com 
  • In writing (e.g., by email, fax, mail) to Supervisor of Elections. Mailing address can be found on respective website.
  • By telephone call to Supervisor of Elections. Manatee County 941-741-3823, Sarasota County 941-861-8600

To make a request, the following information is required:

  • The name of the voter for whom the ballot is being requested;
  • The voter’s address;
  • The voter’s date of birth; and
  • The voter’s signature (if the request is written).

If an immediate family member or legal guardian is requesting a vote-by-mail ballot for a voter, the following additional information must be provided:

  • The requestor’s address;
  • The requestor’s driver’s license number (if available);
  • The requestor’s relationship to the voter; and
  • The requestor’s signature (if the request is written).

The deadline to request that a vote-by-mail ballot be mailed is no later than 5 p.m. on the 10th day before the election. However, the ballot must still be received by the Supervisor of Elections no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day if the voted ballot is to count. Exceptions exist for overseas military and civilian voters. See Military and Overseas Citizens Voting for further information. 

 

 *This ad is not a political endorsement by Temple Beth El.

                                     


Smile of the Day/h2>

David Epstein came home from work to see his wife and young daughter Rivkah, reviewing the girl’s Hebrew homework.

“What are you learning honey?” asked David.

"Well we’re learning Bereishit (Genesis) and Mommy told me how Hashem made the first man and the first woman. He made the man first. But the man was very lonely with nobody to talk to him. So Hashem put the man to sleep. And while the man was asleep, Hashem took out his brains, and made a woman from them."


Donations

Thank you for supporting Temple Beth El with your donation. Please let us know if you would like your donation directed to a specific purpose.  Donate TBE


Yahrzeit Information

June 5th and 6th June 26th and 27th  

Katherine Richmond IMO Weed H. Richmond

Brian Weiss IMO Jack Weiss

 

Florence Shulman IMO May Shyr

Katherine Hoffman IMO Sam Eder  

Sharon Carlson IMO Roberta Ger

Sandy Clark IMO Harry Kleinman

 

Jack Jawitz IMO Aaron Jawitz

 

 

Bernice Kipnes IMO Morris Chasen

 

 

June 12th and 13th

July 3rd and 4th  

Jean Shames IMO Dorothy Dunn

Dick Solyn IMO Myron Solyn

 

Jean Ellis IMO Marie Levy

Ruth Weiss IMO John B. Estrada

 

June 19th and 20th

   

Dick Solyn IMO Alice Solyn

   

Florence Shulman IMO David Aron Shur

   

Beverly Safron IMO Peter Hartwich

   

Paul Stahl IMO Jeanette Lichner

   

 

Sisterhood = Challah and Oneg

YAHRZEIT/MEMORIAL PLAQUES

Temple Beth El yahrzeit plaques are now available for purchase. Purchase one for a loved one already deceased or purchase now for a future date. Plaques can be English and Hebrew or just English or just Hebrew. The cost is $250 per plaque. 

GENERAL DONATIONS

SPECIAL DONATIONS

CANTOR BARD's MUSIC FUND

SIMCHA GRAM CARDS FOR BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY, GET WELL, OR CONGRATULATIONS and SYMPATHY CARDS

RABBI'S DISCRETIONARY FUND

To make a donation, go to www.templebethelbradenton.org/Donate


  June Birthdays June Anniversaries
4 David Gutman 25 Susan and Bill Speilberg
7 Ron Eiseman  
10 David Meier    :
13 Florence Shulman    
14 Eli Lerner  
20 Alan Cohn  
22 Gerry Ronkin  
24 Katherine Hoffman  

Simcha Grams

TBE sends Birthday, Anniversary, Bar/Bat Mitzvah and other celebration "Simcha Grams" to members in honor of their special day. This is a wonderful way to contribute to your Synagogue and to send your TBE family good wishes.

Names must be received at the office by the 20th of the month prior to the birthday, anniversary or special event. Include a note with your name(s),the name(s) of whom and what you are honoring and how you would like your signature on the card they will receive. The donation is $2.00 per name. In the memo area of your check write "simcha gram and mail to:

Temple Beth El, Attention: Simcha Gram,. 5150 Peridea Blvd. East, Bradenton, FL 34203.

If you wish to pay by credit card use the yellow "donate"button above or call the TBE office, 941-755-4900, give them the above information and your credit card authorization.

The card will be mailed to those individuals prior to their special day and your donation will be acknowledged in the newsletter.

If we have somehow overlooked your Simcha or made an error in printing the date, please accept our apologies and call the temple office at 941-755-4900 so that we may update our records.

Contact the Newsletter editor(Kevin Thomas) at yinfiss@hotmail.com

Office: 941-755-4900  Address: 5150 Peridia Blvd East, Bradenton, Fl. 34203

www.templebethelbradenton.orgwww.facebook.com/TBEBradenton


5150 Peridia Blvd E Bradenton, FL 34203 (941)-755-4900 The Temple Office

TBEBradentonFL@yahoo.com 

www.templebethelbradenton.org

www.facebook.com/TBEBradenton

 

Rabbi Michael Sternfield
Cantor Deborah Bard
Cantor Emeritus Alan Cohn
Religious Education Director Susie Konicov
President Ron Eiseman
Exec. Vice President Neil Clark
Treasurer Howard Hammerman
Secretary Bayla Kolton
VP of Membership Helen Hammerman
Immediate Past President Robyn Spirtas
Ritual Katherine Richmond
Board Member at Large Gary Weinberg
Women of Beth El Bonnie Krasik
Men's Club Ken Handelman

 

For Rabbi or Temple information or to RSVP for an event, please email TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com. The Office is located at Temple Beth El, 5150 Peridia Blvd E, Bradenton 34203. Please notate on your check what the monies are for ie: "donation", "dues". You can also find out information or RSVP to an event by going to www.templebethelbradenton.org/events .

Got pocket change? Remember Pushke money? Put your change each day in a ziplock bag, then bring the bag to the Temple as a donation. Every little bit helps! It is a great way to get the kids to contribute too!

 

 

"It is a Tree of Life to those who hold fast to it." Proverbs 3:18  Purchasing a leaf (or leaves) on our Tree of Life, is a wonderful way to mark and sanctify precious life events, such as: B'nai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, birth of a child or grandchild, birthdays, anniversaries, or any special occasion.  It is also a loving way to remember those who have gone before us. Call the TBE office for more info -941-755-4900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                      Please see our temple supporter, Jay Givarz at Fidelity Bank, for all your mortgage needs

Categories
Communications

May 2020 Newsletter

 

A REFORM CONGREGATION  

5150 Peridia Blvd E. BRADENTON, FL 34203

www.TempleBethElBradenton.com
TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com     941-755-4900

Shabbat Services are every Friday night at 7:00 pm
Saturday morning at 10 am followed by Torah Study

Due to the COViD-19 Viral pandemic, live Shabbat Services are are cancelled until further notice.

Shabbat Services can be seen on youtube at Temple_Beth_El_Bradenton

 

  •  

"NEWS AND VIEWS"

BY RABBI MICHAEL STERNFIELD

 

Dear friends,

Amidst all the uncertainty, the bewilderment and the tedium of these times, America is being tested. We the people are not pulling together as we should, and this is to the detriment of far more than the current pandemic. Our collective response to the coronavirus will resonate long after the danger has passed. One of the most important concepts of political philosophy is that we live as a society because there is a general consensus that we are part of the social contract. The social contract is a theory or model that originated during the Age of Enlightenment and usually concerns the legitimacy of the authority of the state over the individual. Social contract theory typically asserts that individuals have consented, either explicitly or tacitly, to surrender some of their freedoms and submit to the authority in exchange for protection and for the maintenance of the social order. The term takes its name from The Social Contract, a 1762 book by Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Judaism embraced this concept long ago. The Torah calls it the Covenant, or in Hebrew: b’rit. The Jewish people often has been referred to as the Children of the Covenant, B’nai Brith actually. Ever since Sinai, we have been taught that God has given us commandments by which to live our daily lives and through which we may live securely with justice, compassion and peace between one another.

Whether we call this the social contract or the Covenant makes little difference. This all boils down to: we are in the same boat. We will sink or swim together. A simple midrash illustrates this point: A group of people were travelling in a boat. One of them took a drill and began to drill a hole beneath himself. His companions said to him: “Why are you doing this?” Replied the man: "What concern is it of yours? Am I not drilling under my own place?" Said they to him: “But you will flood the boat for us all!”

Unfortunately America seems to be disregarding this elementary lesson. This should be a time for national unity and resolve. Instead, by quarrelling over such obvious responsibilities as social distancing, wearing of protective masks, and avoiding public gatherings, including worship services, the very foundation of this country we love so dearly is being undermined. These are times that call for placing the well-being of all above personal preferences. But altruism appears to be in short supply at a time when we need it most. When the real experts, the scientists, tell us that this is not the time for relaxing the restrictions, there should be no arguments. Each of us should be asking only: What can I do to help? If we are advised to wear a protective mask, this is not an infringement on personal liberty, it is the least we can do to help keep all of society safer.

Amidst all the uncertainty, the bewilderment and the tedium of these times, America is being tested in a manner that this nation has not known since the Great Depression and the Second World War. That these limitations placed on us has become a political issue is worrisome. At a time when we should be united by the advice of scientists and physicians, instead we have political finger-pointing and anger. The coronavirus should not be a political issue at all, but from all indications it will be the central issue of the upcoming election. This needs to be a time for national unity and resolve.

We will get through this. Of this I am certain. There very well may emerge a new normal. We may not like it as much as the old normal. But we can make it through successfully if we rededicate ourselves to the social contract, the Covenant, of which we are all beneficiaries.

Shalom,

Rabbi Michael P. Sternfield


MUSIC

Cantor Bard

"Those who sing, pray twice." (Talmud)

Voice! The gift we all possess! If you love to sing (more or less on pitch) and have a musical ear in ensemble, then the congregational choir is for you! For more information: please contact Cantor Bard (773-484-8149)

TBE_Choir

 


 

Message from the President

Shalom Temple family and friends,

I hope this communication finds everyone safe and well! After following our stay at home directives for almost six weeks, all of us have probably developed some sense of cabin fever by now. As I listen to the daily updates on the coronavirus situation, I anxiously await some positive news that indicates the time has approached that we can slowly get back to some normalcy. I am certain that this day will come, but we are not there yet.

I have received many positive comments from our members regarding the weekly spiritual videos that arrive on Erev Shabbat. Rabbi Sternfield and Cantor Bard have been doing a wonderful job in preparing us to celebrate our Sabbath and we thank them both from the bottom of our hearts! You can expect more virtual programming and we hope to add more capabilities in the near future!

All of you should have received TBE mail asking for your votes to approve our new fiscal budget and the establishment of a new Standing committee on Security. Hopefully, we have received all your votes and the results will be announced in a subsequent message. Many thanks to all of our members who participated!

Recently, I sent a request for everyone to help out the Food Bank of Manatee with a donation. They still have critical needs of many items and this organization is one of Temple Beth El’s mitzvah projects. If anyone would like to contribute that has not had the opportunity, I have included a link to their website. Thank you in advance for your generosity.

http://www.mealsonwheelsplus.org/the-food-bank-of-manatee

In closing, I know that we are all facing difficult times but our Temple family remains strong and we are here to help! If anyone needs anything, please let us know.

Stay Healthy and Stay Safe!

Ron Eiseman

President


OUR CALENDAR

In line with recommendations from the CDC, Temple Beth El will not hold any services, meetings or special events until further notice. Please stay healthy and safe. You will be notified of any updates.


MEMBERSHIP

Membership in a synagogue represents a commitment to the community. It means that you are involved in keeping Jewish life alive and seeing it continue to the next generation. It also gives you a framework of giving and contributing to the Shul, and it means that you are a partner in supporting the financial needs of the Synagogue which we are all part of. If you are interested in joining Temple Beth El Bradenton, please contact our membership chair,

Helen Hammerman

 

Welcome New Members

B'ruchim HaBa'im" !We are so happy that you are with us here at Temple Beth El!  We appreciate  your presence and welcome your active participation and look forward to getting to know you.  

Cantor Deborah Bard

* Calling all full time college and graduate students that would like to join the congregation… If you are a full time student 25 or under, you can belong to the synagogue for just $25 per year, yes per year! For more info  call the TBE office at 941-755-4900 and leave your name and phone number.


MENS CLUB NEWS

It is time to start thinking about 2020-2021 Men's Club Membership. 

This last year, half of the Temple's male members joined the Men's Club.  That response was better than what we normally get. I would like to take this opportunity to pitch membership to all the men of Beth El.

People tell me that they don't join the Men's Club because most of our activities take place on Sunday.  Some people believe, that as Temple members, they are entitled to participate in all Men's Club activities whether or not they join the Men's Club.  This, by the way, is true. So why join?

The way our Temple is structured, essential Temple operations are performed by the Men's Club (and Sisterhood).  There is no Ways and Means Chair on the Temple Board, for example, because Temple fundraising is the responsibility of the Men's Club.  Along with fundraising, the Men's Club provides the Temple membership with outings, social activities, mitzvah projects, and whatever support is needed.  When you go to the Temple on the High Holidays, and find the room set up, you can be sure that the Men's Club was there. 

We cannot do any of this without the operating expenses that come from dues.  We do not raise any money for ourselves: what we raise goes directly to the Temple.  We were able to have the Italian fundraiser this year, because Men's Club dues enabled us to cover the cost of the meal. 

The bottom line is that even if you don't attend our meetings and events, as a Temple member, you benefit from the Men's Club.  The Temple could not do the things it does without a functioning Men's Club.  That is why, when contacted about membership, it is so important that you join. 

 

Ken Handelman  Mens Club, President 


Women of Beth El

If you're not a member, come and try us out! 

We are alone….Together! Nothing stops our wonderful “Women of Beth El” from performing Mitzvahs. Not even a Pandemic! A special salute to the following WBE members who have teamed up to become the Temple “Phone Tree:” Jean Ellis, Linda Hoffman, Marlena Johnsky, Beverly Safron, Carol Segal, Florence Shulman, & Kate Richmond. Plus our Men’s Club President & supporter Ken Handleman. Together they reach out their branches to the entire congregation every week. Their many friendly phone calls make sure we are all safe and connected.

 

Bonnie Krasik "Women of Beth El", President

bkrasik@aol.com (248) 661-4583


Hebrew and Religious School

Tu B'shvat Seder

Religious School is happening!

Our 4 teachers are teaching their class members by telephone. So far, it's been 1 to 1 teaching. We're looking at, and talking about holding a Zoom class, where all the students can see and hear each other. 

We're planning for a possible Bar Mitzvah this summer, but plans aren't solidified because of the Corona virus, and the uncertain schedule. 

Cantor, DB and I are taking turns watering the 4 recently planted trees. Hopefully they'll be fine.

Everybody, as far as I know, is fine, and looking forward to life returning to its normal activities.

 

Shalom, 

 

Susie Konicov 

Education Chair

& Hebrew teacher

swkonicov@gmail.com

If you know an unaffiliated Jewish family with young children, who is looking for a shul, please tell them about us! We want to build our religious school and are looking for more students.  

The Jewish Education Loan Fund (JELF) provides interest free loans to Jewish students for college and graduate school. For further information go to their website:      http://JELF.org


The Treasurer's Corner

Treasurer’s Column for the Newsletter

Our fiscal year starts on June 1 and ends on May 31. Those members who would like to pay their dues via a single payment should make their payments in May or early June. The dues structure has not changed. It is $125 per month ($1500 per year) for families and $85 per month ($1020 per year) for singles and part time residents who pay dues at a northern synagogue. We have eliminated the discount for annual payments.

 

For those paying monthly, please consider using your bank’s “bill pay” option. You can set it up one time to send the synagogue, the same amount of money each month on the day of the month that you choose. It costs you and TBE nothing. Payments by credit card cost us about 3 percent.

If you are not sure of your current account balance, feel free to contact me.

 

Howard Hammerman
Treasurer
410-430-3019


Article of the Month

As the coronavirus continues to spread, synagogues, Jewish centers and other organizations that serve as gathering places for the community around the world have closed.

But even while communities cannot come together physically, some are still organizing projects to provide support to those who are suffering or at perilous risk amid the pandemic.

From phone counseling to sewing face masks to buying kosher food for Jewish doctors and nurses, there’s no shortage of ways to help.

Here’s a list of Jewish initiatives that you can support — without having to leave your house.

Get kosher food to Jewish health care workers

Journalist Bethany Mandel is raising money to provide kosher meals for observant Jewish health care providers and their co-workers. She has raised more than $16,000 through more than 200 individual donations, which have been used to order some 40 deliveries from restaurants to hospitals. She is partnering with restaurants in New York, New Jersey, Maryland and Wisconsin for the deliveries. 

Areyvut, a New Jersey-based organization that engages Jewish youth, is delivering Kosher meals to Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck, a heavily Jewish township in New Jersey that has been hit hard by the virus. The organization has raised $4,000.    

Skokie Valley Agudath Jacob, an Orthodox synagogue in Skokie, Illinois, also has raised $4,000, to deliver kosher food to local first responders. 

Sew face masks

A number of Jewish organizations are asking community members with sewing machines to help make face masks, which the CDC says helps lower coronavirus transmission rates. The Jewish Association on Aging, a senior care facility in Pittsburgh, is asking for face mask donations for its at-risk residents. Masks should be made following specific directions and can be dropped of or mailed.

Daniel Ostrov and Stephanie Cole assemble face shields in Kohelet Yeshiva High School’s “fab lab.” (Courtesy of Kohelet)

Kohelet Yeshiva High School, an Orthodox day school in suburban Philadelphia, has turned its high-tech arts center into a factory for making face shields  for local doctors and nurses treating coronavirus patients. The shields are made of a transparent acrylic that covers medical providers’ entire faces to protect against bacteria and viruses that can be present in droplets when patients cough or sneeze.

The school has made 200 shields but recently started implementing a new production method that will allow it to significantly ramp up production. Kohelet has raised money to sustain production for five weeks and it is raising additional funds here.

Send food to community members struggling with poverty

B’nai Brith Canada is raising emergency funds for needy Jewish community members in the Greater Toronto area, including seniors, who are struggling amid food pantry closures. 

Masbia, a network of kosher soup kitchens in Brooklyn and Queens, is looking to raise $350,000 to provide food for 1,000 people who are quarantined amid the pandemic. Each box contains enough food to last 14 days. The organization has raised more than $100,000. 

Provide phone counseling

Ruach: Emotional and Spiritual Support is a group of Jewish therapists, social workers, rabbis and chaplains who are providing free emotional support to community members during the pandemic. Those looking to be counseled fill out a form to be paired with a provider who will call them for a 30-minute phone session.

The initiative, which is organized by Jewish doctoral student and spiritual care intern Taylor Winfield Haboucha, is seeking additional volunteers to offer care. Licensed therapists, social workers and clergy, as well as board-certified chaplains, can get more info and apply to participate by emailing RuachEmotionalandSpiritualCare@gmail.com.

B’nai Brith Canada is raising emergency funds for needy Jewish community members in the Greater Toronto area, including seniors, who are struggling amid food pantry closures. 

Masbia, a network of kosher soup kitchens in Brooklyn and Queens, is looking to raise $350,000 to provide food for 1,000 people who are quarantined amid the pandemic. Each box contains enough food to last 14 days. The organization has raised more than $100,000. 

Provide phone counseling

Ruach: Emotional and Spiritual Support is a group of Jewish therapists, social workers, rabbis and chaplains who are providing free emotional support to community members during the pandemic. Those looking to be counseled fill out a form to be paired with a provider who will call them for a 30-minute phone session.

The initiative, which is organized by Jewish doctoral student and spiritual care intern Taylor Winfield Haboucha, is seeking additional volunteers to offer care. Licensed therapists, social workers and clergy, as well as board-certified chaplains, can get more info and apply to participate by emailing RuachEmotionalandSpiritualCare@gmail.com.

Check up on Holocaust survivors

Chabad of Southwest Broward, Florida, is organizing volunteers to make daily and weekly calls to homebound Holocaust survivors and seniors. Though the seniors all live in South Florida, volunteers can visit sunshinecirclefl.com, call 754-800-4770 or email Andrusier at libaandru@gmail.com for more information on the volunteer program.


Smile of the Day

A woman on a train walked up to a man across the table. “Excuse me,” she said, “but are you Jewish?”
“No,” replied the man.
A few minutes later the woman returned. “Excuse me,” she said again, “are you sure you’re not Jewish?”
“I’m sure,” said the man.
But the woman was not convinced, and a few minutes later she approached him a third time. “Are you absolutely sure you’re not Jewish?” she asked.
“All right, all right,” the man said. “You win. I’m Jewish.”
“That’s funny,” said the woman.” You don’t look Jewish.”


Donations

Thank you for supporting Temple Beth El with your donation. Please let us know if you would like your donation directed to a specific purpose.  Donate TBE

Yahrzeits

Jean Ellis IMO Rebeca Levy and Eve Pesk

Karen Knoll IMO Roger Knoll

 

Yahrzeit Information

May 1st and 2nd May 22st and 23nd

Lois Gerber IMO Rebecca Gerber

Judie Littell IMO Bennett Levy

Pearl Friedman IMO David Scharfman

Marlena Johnsky IMO Daniel Johnsky

Linda Hoffman IMO Bessie Slavin

Jean Steiger IMO Paul Ostrov

Neil Clark IMO Jennie Clark

Roger Danziger IMO Arthur Danziger

Dottie Mizzi IMO Rebecca Abo

Loren Hoffman IMO Elsie Hoffman

Beverly Safron IMO Thea Lehmann

Carol Segal IMO Bernice Cohen

May 8th and 9th February 29th and 30th

Jean Ellis IMO Gerald Abowitz

Dick Solyn IMO Myron Solyn

Carol Segal IMO Bernard Albert Cohen

Ruth Weiss IMO John B. Estrada

Alan Cohn IMO Jack Cohn

Lois Gerber IMO Israel Gerber

Anna Bever IMO Sarah Berlin

 

May 15th and 16th

 

Iras Roback IMO Lewis Lavine

 

Linda Hoffman IMO Art Samson

 

Bayla Kolton IMO Edward Kolton

 

 

 

Sisterhood = Challah and Oneg

YAHRZEIT/MEMORIAL PLAQUES

Temple Beth El yahrzeit plaques are now available for purchase. Purchase one for a loved one already deceased or purchase now for a future date. Plaques can be English and Hebrew or just English or just Hebrew. The cost is $250 per plaque. 

GENERAL DONATIONS

SPECIAL DONATIONS

CANTOR BARD's MUSIC FUND

SIMCHA GRAM CARDS FOR BIRTHDAY, ANNIVERSARY, GET WELL, OR CONGRATULATIONS and SYMPATHY CARDS

RABBI'S DISCRETIONARY FUND

To make a donation, go to www.templebethelbradenton.com/Donate

 

  May Birthdays May Anniversaries
1 Neil Clark 4  Eli and Neva Lerner
2 Ron Adelson 9  Stephanie and Cliff Peshek
6 Carol Segal 29  Albert and Staci Rosenstein  :
8 Marlena Johnsky    
8 Lionel Freedman  
9 Dan Breitberg  
10 Larry Lev  
14 Marv Howard  
14 Amelia Clark  
21 Rebecca Hadesman  
22 Fran Burday  
24 Ellen Tillotson  
25  Robin Eisman  
31 Celia Strickler  

 

Simcha Grams

TBE sends Birthday, Anniversary, Bar/Bat Mitzvah and other celebration "Simcha Grams" to members in honor of their special day. This is a wonderful way to contribute to your Synagogue and to send your TBE family good wishes.

Names must be received at the office by the 20th of the month prior to the birthday, anniversary or special event. Include a note with your name(s),the name(s) of whom and what you are honoring and how you would like your signature on the card they will receive. The donation is $2.00 per name. In the memo area of your check write "simcha gram and mail to:

Temple Beth El, Attention: Simcha Gram,. 5150 Peridea Blvd. East, Bradenton, FL 34203.

If you wish to pay by credit card use the yellow "donate"button above or call the TBE office, 941-755-4900, give them the above information and your credit card authorization.

The card will be mailed to those individuals prior to their special day and your donation will be acknowledged in the newsletter.

If we have somehow overlooked your Simcha or made an error in printing the date, please accept our apologies and call the temple office at 941-755-4900 so that we may update our records.

Contact the Newsletter editor(Kevin Thomas) at yinfiss@hotmail.com

Office: 941-755-4900  Address: 5150 Peridia Blvd East, Bradenton, Fl. 34203

www.templebethelbradenton.com     www.facebook.com/TBEBradenton


5150 Peridia Blvd E Bradenton, FL 34203 (941)-755-4900 The Temple Office

TBEBradentonFL@yahoo.com 

www.templebethelbradenton.com

www.facebook.com/TBEBradenton

 

Rabbi Michael Sternfield
Cantor Deborah Bard
Cantor Emeritus Alan Cohn
Religious Education Director Susie Konicov
President Ron Eiseman
Exec. Vice President Neil Clark
Treasurer Howard Hammerman
Secretary Bayla Kolton
VP of Membership Helen Hammerman
Immediate Past President Robyn Spirtas
Ritual Katherine Richmond
Board Member at Large Gary Weinberg
Women of Beth El Bonnie Krasik
Men's Club Ken Handelman

 

for Rabbi or Temple information or to RSVP for an event, please email TBEBradentonfl@yahoo.com. The Office is located at Temple Beth El, 5150 Peridia Blvd E, Bradenton 34203. Please notate on your check what the monies are for ie: "donation", "dues". You can also find out information or RSVP to an event by going to www.templebethelbradenton.com/events .

Got pocket change? Remember Pushke money? Put your change each day in a ziplock bag, then bring the bag to the Temple as a donation. Every little bit helps! It is a great way to get the kids to contribute too!

 

 

"It is a Tree of Life to those who hold fast to it." Proverbs 3:18  Purchasing a leaf (or leaves) on our Tree of Life, is a wonderful way to mark and sanctify precious life events, such as: B'nai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, birth of a child or grandchild, birthdays, anniversaries, or any special occasion.  It is also a loving way to remember those who have gone before us. Call the TBE office for more info –
941-755-4900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please see our temple supporter, Jay Givarz at Fidelity Bank, for all your mortgage needs